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South Sudan becomes world's newest nation - Africa - Al Jazeera English

modernemeid:

Juba, South Sudan - Tens of thousands of people have gathered in Juba to celebrate the birth of South Sudan, the world’s newest nation.

Around the mausoleum of John Garang - the longtime leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement - a crowd began to form shortly after daybreak on Saturday, with thousands of South Sudanese flocking to claim a spot.

A delegation of South Sudanese officials and foreign dignitaries from Zimbabwe to Norway were scheduled to attend a ceremony at the mausoleum celebrating the creation of South Sudan. The country’s official birth is set to come at 11:45am local time, when assembly Speaker James Wani Igga reads the proclamation of independence.

Some groups at the mausoleum broke into traditional song and dance; others waved the new South Sudanese flag. One man waved a banner proclaiming that independence meant “freedom from slavery”.

Few in the crowd had seats, or anything to shield them from the scorching sun, but no one seemed to be complaining.

“This is what we fought for!” one man yelled, leading a march of several dozen people into the mausoleum. “Remember our martyrs. They did not die in vain.”

Security was tight at the venue, and indeed in Juba as a whole. Private vehicles have been barred from driving on main roads in the South Sudanese capital, and dozens of police and soldiers have encircled the mausoleum.

The ceremony is expected to last for at least four hours. It will include speeches from visiting dignitaries; a formal lowering of the Sudanese flag and a raising of the South Sudanese one; the first public singing of the southern national anthem; and the signing the transitional constitution by Salva Kiir, the country’s first president.

South Sudan becomes world's newest nation - Africa - Al Jazeera English

modernemeid:

Juba, South Sudan - Tens of thousands of people have gathered in Juba to celebrate the birth of South Sudan, the world’s newest nation.

Around the mausoleum of John Garang - the longtime leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement - a crowd began to form shortly after daybreak on Saturday, with thousands of South Sudanese flocking to claim a spot.

A delegation of South Sudanese officials and foreign dignitaries from Zimbabwe to Norway were scheduled to attend a ceremony at the mausoleum celebrating the creation of South Sudan. The country’s official birth is set to come at 11:45am local time, when assembly Speaker James Wani Igga reads the proclamation of independence.

Some groups at the mausoleum broke into traditional song and dance; others waved the new South Sudanese flag. One man waved a banner proclaiming that independence meant “freedom from slavery”.

Few in the crowd had seats, or anything to shield them from the scorching sun, but no one seemed to be complaining.

“This is what we fought for!” one man yelled, leading a march of several dozen people into the mausoleum. “Remember our martyrs. They did not die in vain.”

Security was tight at the venue, and indeed in Juba as a whole. Private vehicles have been barred from driving on main roads in the South Sudanese capital, and dozens of police and soldiers have encircled the mausoleum.

The ceremony is expected to last for at least four hours. It will include speeches from visiting dignitaries; a formal lowering of the Sudanese flag and a raising of the South Sudanese one; the first public singing of the southern national anthem; and the signing the transitional constitution by Salva Kiir, the country’s first president.

(Source: modernemeid)

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